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Pink Wing Bi-colour pea

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  • Pink Wing Bi-colour pea

    This took my eye yesterday, seems there are 3 or 4 plants with similarly marked flowers!

  • #2
    Is this pink on the outside and white on the inside? Or is one of the wings pink and the other white?

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    • #3
      They are both dark and light on the wings, both sides.

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      • #4
        Oh I see, each petal has both colours, white at the base and pink at the top. Thank you for the additional photos. How unusual !

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        • #5
          It's really quite pretty, especially on the darker type. I thought at first it was just one of those things, but I think as there are 4 plants displaying it, perhaps genetic and might be inherited?

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          • #6
            I got carried away!

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            • #7
              That's definitely NOT a one-off. I wish the gene list of JIC was a bit easier to understand for 'me numpty'. I'll have a look though.

              I am somewhat envious here! You do get so many more interesting flower colours. Had it not been for the unusual 'redder Elisabeth' here I'd say there must be something very special in your soil.or in the air. Enjoy (and DO get carried away taking piccies for us all to see, please)

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              • #8
                [QUOTE=Galina;n1146]That's definitely NOT a one-off. /QUOTE]

                I hope you are right, though I've no seeds and I'm not sure I'll get any! But it is nice to see

                Lol, I'm glad it's not just me having issues navigating and understanding JIC, I may go and brave the site!

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                • #9
                  I found this at John Innes Centre bip gene they have a picture with similar markings though theirs is a rather stunning example in purple! Is it the same?

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                  • #10
                    Looks like it! I was wondering that when I first saw your pics. I have a few bip seeds but didn't sow them this year.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Silverleaf View Post
                      Looks like it! I was wondering that when I first saw your pics. I have a few bip seeds but didn't sow them this year.
                      Cool, a pink bip! I couldn't find any pictures of one so I wasn't sure. It would be so good to get a few seeds saved, fingers crossed. The question is where did it come from and I wonder how many varieties might have it lurking? Are your bip purple flowered? They look so striking in the picture. Are you going to grow them next year, can't wait to see them. Do you know if they are dwarf or tall?

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                      • #12
                        I don't know anything about them other than they have bip, unfortunately.

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                        • #13
                          And I might grow them next year if I can find a space.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by jayb View Post

                            The question is where did it come from and I wonder how many varieties might have it lurking? Are your bip purple flowered? They look so striking in the picture. Are you going to grow them next year,
                            Glad you found the bip gene. Well on the website you quoted it says that the mutagenic agent is spontaneous, which I read as 'it just happens for no particular reason'. You got lucky, in other words. It is a recessive gene. Fab!
                            Last edited by Galina; 18-09-2014, 17:05.

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                            • #15
                              Interesting, I started to think it might have been a mutation the year before, but I came down more to thinking along the line of as these are an F2 variety and there are 4 possibly 6 plants with this trait out of at a guess 20-30 plants, that it might be a recessive gene coming to the fore. Which I guess could equally be from a mutation in the previous year as much as a hidden gene from either of the stable parents.

                              If it weren't so late in the season I'd make a couple of crosses with the parents to see if it can be repeated.

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