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  • FT hybrids

    A few tomato varieties are described as FT hybrids. I haven't been able to find an explanation of what an FT hybrid is.

    Presumably not the same as F1?

  • #2
    That's a mystery to me, sorry I can't be of more help. Maybe a typo by the copywriter who misread 'F1' in a difficult font

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    • jayb
      jayb commented
      Editing a comment
      That sounds reasonable.

  • #3
    FT, It's not a term I'm familiar with when describing tomatoes, possibly floribunda truss or flowering truss? Are they recent introductions? Genes? Genetically modified perhaps?

    Is it just tomato plants or other species you have come across the term?

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    • #4
      If you tell us which these varieties were maybe we can follow up on variety names separately from the term FT, which in turn if FT is a 'thing' would come up again.

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      • #5
        Many thanks for the responses and lovely wishes to help! I've only come across it in connection with tomatoes as in:

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        • Galina
          Galina commented
          Editing a comment
          I have seen it several times now. But no explanation. Annoyingly it also pops up when a pdf is converted to a word file. On the pdf it is F1 and on the word document it is Ft. It does not help that the Financial Times paper occasionally makes readers offers of tomato seed. I am no closer to unravelling that mystery. There is also plant breeding by FT IR spectroscopy, whatever that means.
          https://link.springer.com/article/10...892-015-0108-7
          Will keep my eyes open.
          Last edited by Galina; 24-01-2020, 06:58.

      • #6
        Thanks for the photo,

        Going on the way Tomato growers site describes it range http://www.tomatogrowers.com/Tomatoes/departments/1/ I think they are listing symbols for disease resistance. Or at least other letters listed similarly are.
        Perhaps Tobacco Mosaic virus is T, though this is usually TMV. F for fusarium wilt?

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        • Galina
          Galina commented
          Editing a comment
          That makes perfect sense. It describes resistances. I have asked the question on the OSSI forum, hope we will get chapter and verse from there.
          Last edited by Galina; 24-01-2020, 11:04.

        • jayb
          jayb commented
          Editing a comment
          Lol, I've asked at Tomatoville too!

      • #7
        Following an email request, Tomato Growers seed site has confirmed to a smashing Tomatoville member that for their catalogue FT stands for Tobacco mosaic virus and Fusarium wilt. For other sites, I don't know whether others have just copied and pasted their descriptions or perhaps they are just using the same letters as abbreviations.
        Last edited by jayb; 26-01-2020, 08:26.

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        • Jang
          Jang commented
          Editing a comment
          FT has become TF here but if showing resistance to these two afflictions the order is immaterial I guess.
          Thanks jayb and Galina for pursuing so purposefully. Rather bewildering that it’s used quite freely without explanation, or at least necessitating a lot of persistence to find the explanation.
          Many thanks again for illuminating.

        • jayb
          jayb commented
          Editing a comment
          My typo, I'll edit it.
          Tomato Growers site uses FT.

      • #8
        I think these short abbreviations are used more in the US. Confusingly there also seems to be more than one method used for abbreviations.
        Here's a link to an index with FT, it's at the bottom of the page https://hgic.clemson.edu/factsheet/t...ses-disorders/

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