Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Wild leek

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    The difference is very simple. Babington leaves when crushed have a faint garlic smell and taste, leek does not. Goes away with cooking. I have not come across PP and I am not sure what these bulbil bearing poireau perpetuels are. As they could be crossed with ordinary leeks (as we have seen with the seeds of the grex from the Czech seed company bred by Telsing Andrews which you pointed out to us Triffid) I guess they must be in the leek family. I wonder what their leaves smell and taste like.

    My dividing leek divides and makes flowers and seeds, but no bulbils. And definitely no garlicky smell. It is akin to a larger version of Minogue rather than a form of Babington. (Having said this I am aware that I have this oddity in the garden, the Minogue with top bulbils). Leeks can be forced to produce top bulbils. So bulbils are a feature of the leek types as well as the garlicky types it seems but much rarer. But I have not seen them (yet) on my dividing leek.

    If poireau perpetuel with top bulbils (Babington has top bulbils of course) has the faint garlic smell, it would make it a member of the garlic family rather the leek family, like a variant of elephant garlic. Babington and elephant garlic are supposedly related, one a cultivated form that has stopped producing the top bulbils but grows a larger bulb, the other a wild form with a smaller bulb that still can.

    When I talk about garlic vs leek family by garlicky flavour vs lack of garlicky flavour, this is my attempt to make sense of the various alliums. Not anything scientific, just what I experience on the ground.
    Last edited by Galina; 21-05-2020, 08:01.

    Comment


    • Jang
      Jang commented
      Editing a comment
      Your own taste test will be the one, but I just came across this in an Incredible Vegetables article by Mandy Barber: "Poireau perpetuel is resilient and fast growing, emerging December/January and producing a slender leek with a hint of garlic".(https://www.agricology.co.uk/sites/d...redibleVeg.pdf)

      She goes on to say that the British Babington wild leek is "equivalent"
      Last edited by Jang; 21-05-2020, 21:31.

    • Galina
      Galina commented
      Editing a comment
      Fascinating Jang. Babington Leek is equivalent to PP and is a live pollen donor to real leek? I haven't seen seeds on Babington. But can cross with leek when it flowers. Or does Telsing have fertile PP. I wish I knew much more about how Telsing did the cross or how it happened. That is then a real cross between leek and garlic types. This is getting really exciting. Love alliums.

    • Jang
      Jang commented
      Editing a comment
      The garlic hint taste seemed clear according to Incredible Vegetables but in fact Backyard Larder contradicts this: "A perennial leek, a cross made by Telsing Andrews between Oerprei (‘ancient leek’, a form of Allium ampeloprasum) and a selection of St Victor leek with especially blue winter colouration.
      These are quite special as they are a perennial leek with a true leek flavour rather than the garlic flavour of Babington leek.".
      So Triffid's taste test is definitely the decider!
Working...
X