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  • Jang
    commented on 's reply
    The garlic hint taste seemed clear according to Incredible Vegetables but in fact Backyard Larder contradicts this: "A perennial leek, a cross made by Telsing Andrews between Oerprei (‘ancient leek’, a form of Allium ampeloprasum) and a selection of St Victor leek with especially blue winter colouration.
    These are quite special as they are a perennial leek with a true leek flavour rather than the garlic flavour of Babington leek.".
    So Triffid's taste test is definitely the decider!

  • Galina
    commented on 's reply
    Fascinating Jang. Babington Leek is equivalent to PP and is a live pollen donor to real leek? I haven't seen seeds on Babington. But can cross with leek when it flowers. Or does Telsing have fertile PP. I wish I knew much more about how Telsing did the cross or how it happened. That is then a real cross between leek and garlic types. This is getting really exciting. Love alliums.

  • Jang
    commented on 's reply
    Your own taste test will be the one, but I just came across this in an Incredible Vegetables article by Mandy Barber: "Poireau perpetuel is resilient and fast growing, emerging December/January and producing a slender leek with a hint of garlic".(https://www.agricology.co.uk/sites/d...redibleVeg.pdf)

    She goes on to say that the British Babington wild leek is "equivalent"
    Last edited by Jang; 21-05-2020, 21:31.

  • Galina
    commented on 's reply
    Yes please. I am really interested in whether PP has the garlic flavour and smell or not.

    Btw I could not resist the Czech offer and have some babies of Telsing's cross, although slow germination, so far 14 out of 50 seeds, fewer by far compared to the leek seeds I have taken last year which had excellent germination. We will see how they progress. I think I have seen this too with Minogues. Growing from seeds the germination is lower than expected.

    Maybe these alliums that are geared towards vegetative propagation, have fewer viable seeds as a result.
    Last edited by Galina; 21-05-2020, 20:01.

  • triffid
    commented on 's reply
    Thank you very much for the explanation. Time to crush some leaves.

  • Galina
    replied
    The difference is very simple. Babington leaves when crushed have a faint garlic smell and taste, leek does not. Goes away with cooking. I have not come across PP and I am not sure what these bulbil bearing poireau perpetuels are. As they could be crossed with ordinary leeks (as we have seen with the seeds of the grex from the Czech seed company bred by Telsing Andrews which you pointed out to us Triffid) I guess they must be in the leek family. I wonder what their leaves smell and taste like.

    My dividing leek divides and makes flowers and seeds, but no bulbils. And definitely no garlicky smell. It is akin to a larger version of Minogue rather than a form of Babington. (Having said this I am aware that I have this oddity in the garden, the Minogue with top bulbils). Leeks can be forced to produce top bulbils. So bulbils are a feature of the leek types as well as the garlicky types it seems but much rarer. But I have not seen them (yet) on my dividing leek.

    If poireau perpetuel with top bulbils (Babington has top bulbils of course) has the faint garlic smell, it would make it a member of the garlic family rather the leek family, like a variant of elephant garlic. Babington and elephant garlic are supposedly related, one a cultivated form that has stopped producing the top bulbils but grows a larger bulb, the other a wild form with a smaller bulb that still can.

    When I talk about garlic vs leek family by garlicky flavour vs lack of garlicky flavour, this is my attempt to make sense of the various alliums. Not anything scientific, just what I experience on the ground.
    Last edited by Galina; 21-05-2020, 08:01.

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  • triffid
    replied
    Are 'wild leeks' in this context considered synonymous with what is often traded as 'perennial leek' or 'perpetual leek/poireau perpétuel'?
    I got a few bulbils of 'Poireau perpétuel' from Incredible Vegetables in winter, as well as seeds of what were named 'perennial leeks' from Kelly Winterton, and have since found clusters of some sort of dividing leek at the new allotment. All are growing well, and the feral clusters at the allotment have now produced scapes. Should I expect seed or bulbils from these, or both? Could they be Babington's? I have a few young Babs but honestly do not know how to differentiate.

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  • Galina
    replied
    Blimey - only two days later ...............................
    Photo shows the cut leek planted in a little pot. And one of the bulblets has already grown. Will be interesting to see if and how many of the other bulblets will grow into a separate plant.
    Last edited by Galina; 28-04-2017, 05:53.

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  • Galina
    replied
    Barkingdog, I have shared my seeds with the seed circle on Allotments for All forum. It should be grown more widely we hope.

    Yesterday I harvested the rest of my ordinary leeks. And several of them had tiny bulblets around the stem just above the roots. I have cut off the top on the one with most of these bulblets to prevent flowering. Then I replanted this leek. I hope that instead of flowering, the tiny bulblets will grow into baby plants around the old leek. In other words, my experiment for this year is to grow an ordinary leek and force it into vegetative multiplication by preventing flowering. Or to put it simply, explore how to grow a garden leek along the lines of a Wild Leek..

    Much has been written on this forum about what happens when we grow shallots to seed (which are traditionally reproduced by offsets) and you might find this interesting to read. If you have ordinary leeks in the garden, you might try your hand at breeding your own line of Wild Leek by encouraging vegetative multiplication over a few years. Would be great to compare notes on this experiment.
    Last edited by Galina; 26-04-2017, 10:23.

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  • Barkingdog
    replied
    Originally posted by Silverleaf View Post
    I know Backyard Larder has Babington leeks. http://backyardlarder.co.uk/shop/babington-leek/

    Disclaimer: I haven't bought anything from there before but they do have a few interesting things.
    Thanks - I've just ordered some perennial kale from there, didn't notice the leeks 😬 So do you know where I can find Wild leek or is it like finding the Holy Grail 😁

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  • Silverleaf
    replied
    I know Backyard Larder has Babington leeks. http://backyardlarder.co.uk/shop/babington-leek/

    Disclaimer: I haven't bought anything from there before but they do have a few interesting things.
    Last edited by Silverleaf; 24-04-2017, 08:04.

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  • Barkingdog
    replied
    Both really but I understand wild leeks are hard to come by so I thought Babington's was easier to get hold of 😀

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  • Galina
    commented on 's reply
    Wild Leek or Babington Leek? The two are different.

  • Barkingdog
    replied
    Does anyone know where I can get hold of Babington leeks - I'm really interested in trying them out they sound fascinating

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  • Galina
    replied
    I was a little concerned when goodlife mentioned that her leeks had never produced any viable seeds at all and barely flowered, whereas all the leeks here flowered. The seed ripened and looked good. As usual with leeks the drying has to go right up to the wire, It took until the end of the year for the seeds to fully dry. Very pleasing to see that they are germinating without problems. And equally pleasing that the old stumps, where I had cut off the seed heads are now surrounded by baby leek plants. These I will transplant soon. I have found a video from Australia which describes these or very similar leeks and their cultivation: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5OEqDpRwyBg

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