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  • Tennessee Greasy Beans

    A bean mix, possibly segregating?

    Tennessee Greasy: 70 days. A true mix. I've tried for over 10 years to segregate this. I've concluded that it is a true mixture. Seeds are various colors as well as having pods of various shapes and textures. Beans can be used both in the green snap stage and dried for soup. Ornamental and colorful.
    http://www.sandhillpreservation.com/catalog/bean.html

    I grew a few of these this year, the ones on the right are the seeds I received and those on the left some of the ones I picked.

    Tennessee Greasy Beans by jayb 35, on Flickr

    Grown 2014
    Tennessee Greasy Beans by jayb 35, on Flickr

    And again but mixed up
    Tennessee Greasy Beans by jayb 35, on Flickr

    None of the lighter solid coloured beans returned and more speckle ones than sown, it's a shame I didn't grow more to get a fuller expression.

  • #2
    Well some beans don't ever seem to segregate. Which is actually a huge advantage - long before hybrid vigour was made use of commercially in more recent times, these hybrids seem to have been used and flourished. There are several native Indian strains of bean that always come as bean mixes. I guess keeping the most complex types means keeping all the characteristics and not weakening the 'grex'. Your dark greys (middle picture top right) and light greys (middle picture bottom right) seem to 'contain' all colours and patterns and the plain light brown ones (or similar to them) can potentially segregate out of these complex ones.

    The Georgian beans #10 and #T23 do the same here. Plant one such grex and get a whole bean garden.

    I grew Georgian #T23 this year and had very early beans, as well as very late beans. Best of all was a mid to late, very large bean. Long, flat and wide pods, green with purple hue, extremely productive too. But of course it won't come back in the same form next year, but there will be another that does similarly well. I am quite convinced that each of the beans saved from that one type will be different from the next. This year I planted (in groups of 3 and 4) what were identical looking seeds from previous years on mini wigwams of 3 poles each, but each wigwam had more than one type. Great fun!

    Were all of your Tennessee greasy beans actually greasy? ,

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    • #3
      Forgot to add. Some of the stems on Georgian #T23 out of the blue have reddish stems (most are green). What colour stems do these have?

      More on Tennessee Greasy here:
      http://forums.gardenweb.com/forums/l...157225.html?21

      The one common factor is that everybody who grows them gets a mix back and in different locations different colours within that mix seem to predominate. Some get more of one type, others of another. All seeds come from the same source. It is entirely consistent with your findings Jayb.
      Last edited by Galina; 29-11-2014, 06:03.

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      • #4
        Yes, it's this not segregating that interests me, I came across a mention this might be due to an instability gene, but I haven't looked into it further yet.

        Your Georgian beans sound amazing and very interesting indeed, lots of fun!

        Were they all Greasy's? I didn't really do a check, they were quite uniform in size and shape though. As far as I remember Green stems only. Nice link, love the purple pods.

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        • #5
          Interestingly only a gardener from the North (Canada) reported purple pods. Nobody further South had these. Makes you wonder (along with the different types of selections of harvested seed mixes that people seem to get) whether some beans could go one way or another and it all depends on the growing conditions they face. This ability to go one way or another is visible in inversed seeds where background and pattern colours switch. Not a permanent mutation, just for one season. Maybe some seeds can go further still and have several very different expressions available to them. Just thinking aloud really ...........

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          • #6
            Interesting thoughts, I'm not sure about pod colour though, seems a bit drastic?
            Although the seed colour pattern of Anazasi beans is different when I grow them to a hotter sunnier climate. They even vary here year to year depending on a good summer or a poor one. I wonder if other beans do this too?

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            • #7
              Originally posted by jayb View Post
              Interesting thoughts, I'm not sure about pod colour though, seems a bit drastic?
              Although the seed colour pattern of Anazasi beans is different when I grow them to a hotter sunnier climate. They even vary here year to year depending on a good summer or a poor one. I wonder if other beans do this too?
              Yes I agree, we don't know of course whether there has been a cross to produce those purple pods. But, like you, I am somewhat convinced that different climates can have different expression in some beans, mostly the pinto type (beyond the obvious, like shorter, darker green plants in hotter, drier summers etc). I read somewhere that the pinto beans all originate from crosses with runnerbeans. Features of this may be incomplete uniformity. Certainly my accidental crosses with runnerbeans exhibit pinto features on the seeds and instability. The variable Georgian beans which exhibit similar traits were given to me as French Beans, but they have features that could suggest interspecies crosses in the past too.. Just to add, the pinto type patterned bean seeds are also the ones that show inversions in their seedcoat colours.

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