Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Climbing French Bean Kwintus aka Early Riser

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Climbing French Bean Kwintus aka Early Riser

    A swap with a lady from the USA, the same lady, Rose Alene McArthur, who gave me the Red Breton shallot seeds. (I can't remember what I gave her but hope she had as much good food from my seeds as I had from her seeds). These beans are something to behold. Not only are they fairly early and their alternative name is Early Riser, but the plants are loaded with these nearly foot long wide pods. Such a good performer. White flowered. Kwintus is a favourite bean.

  • #2
    Wow!
    They are huge!
    They look amazing.
    Sorry to be so late but, how did they taste?

    Comment


    • Galina
      Galina commented
      Editing a comment
      A very fine green bean, excellent eating and early to boot.

  • #3
    How funny, I've just twigged the aka Early Riser name, I think I'm waiting for some to arrive. So glad to have your first-hand recommendation. Perhaps that's what attracted me to your picture. I didn't make the connection until this evening!

    Comment


    • Galina
      Galina commented
      Editing a comment
      Where did you order them from? I am sure you will love them.

  • #4
    I'm sure I will, they sound and look lovely. They are from Irish Seed Savers, https://store.irishseedsavers.ie/Ear...seed-riser.htm

    Comment


    • Galina
      Galina commented
      Editing a comment
      Tried Algarve but was struggling in Rushden. Would have probably done fine in the greenhouse, but there space is at a premium and not necessarily for beans. I made an exception for Succotash, but not for Algarve because Kwintus is so much easier to grow.

    • jayb
      jayb commented
      Editing a comment
      Algarve has a great write up, such a shame it struggled in Rushden, hardly the Arctic Circle.
      Awww, Succotash, so love these beans! They have to be one of my all-time favourites, such an unusual look, I didn't think I've ever seen similar. Jeannine once gave me recipe pointers for cooking Succotash and my goodness it looks and tastes lush!

    • Galina
      Galina commented
      Editing a comment
      Not the Arctic Circle but the "spine of the country" also on a slightly exposed location and on clay soil, which all added togethe make it harder to grow a lot of things. We did have frosts in June more than once and generally quite a bit colder than lower lying areas. Even Rushden town (where MIL gardens) is quite a bit warmer, the difference is as much as 2 degrees.

  • #5
    It is easy to forget sometimes what wide growing conditions the UK has even though it is quite a small country.
    How much do you think your new garden will differ? Colder winters perhaps but warmer summers?
    Sorry thought I was commenting again, I think I just have to go with whatever
    Last edited by jayb; 20-01-2020, 20:11.

    Comment


    • #6
      I think so but it is generally in a warmish area, so winters should not be too cold. Coldest in UK was -16. Summers should be warmer. I will see how it works out.

      Comment


      • jayb
        jayb commented
        Editing a comment
        Ouch, that's cold!
        Sounds good, warmer weather should open the doors for some crops or varieties that struggle here. Easier seed drying too. I may develop mild growing envy. Good for you and I hope it's a great season coming.
    Working...
    X