Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

All our cucurbits in 2021

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • All our cucurbits in 2021

    Maybe we would like to start a picture gallery and short description of our cucurbita this year, a bit like the bean thread? Here are some of mine.

  • #2
    A real mainstay every year are my Buttercups (cucurbita maxima). Just right for a smaller household, early, reliable and store for a long time. I have had several go well into May and even June the following year. They also freeze well, don't need peeling as they have soft skin. Just great all round. Oh and they taste good too.

    This year with all the rain I am however struggling to keep on top of the hundreds of well-fed slugs. Despite trowel karate chops every evening their population is endless, not helped by the vines rambling into the grass. I had to remove six slugs off this poor fruit.


    Click image for larger version  Name:	butttercup.JPG Views:	0 Size:	147.0 KB ID:	14963 Click image for larger version  Name:	buttercupslugholes.JPG Views:	0 Size:	142.4 KB ID:	14964 Click image for larger version  Name:	buttercup.JPG Views:	0 Size:	186.4 KB ID:	14965
    Last edited by Galina; 31-07-2021, 07:55.

    Comment


    • Galina
      Galina commented
      Editing a comment
      Yes it is the Spanish slugs that are a menace here and additionally a few equally large black slugs. They are a all over plants, even climb up to the top of the runner bean obelisk. Have to look into nematodes.

    • jayb
      jayb commented
      Editing a comment
      Just searched Spanish slugs, ugh.
      I didn't realise there are so many different types, I'll have to take a bit more notice of what is lurking.

    • Galina
      Galina commented
      Editing a comment
      Triffid you were right. That fruit has now calloused right over and the deep cavities seem to have almost filled now. Two smaller fruits have disappeared altogether, but this one is ok. I did mention how you don't need to peel these. Clearly the slugs are also finding their skins easy to get into.

  • #3
    The acorn squashes are also called autumn squashes as they have a limited amount of storage life. Normally cucurbita pepo do not store well, but the acorn squashes do. And one of the best tasting is Thelma Sanders. Here an immature fruit, only orange size at the moment. Still waiting for a matching flower set to appear.

    Click image for larger version  Name:	thelma sanders.JPG Views:	40 Size:	104.8 KB ID:	14967
    Last edited by Galina; 15-08-2021, 15:36.

    Comment


    • jayb
      jayb commented
      Editing a comment
      I like these too, looks like it is going to be a beauty.
      I made a mistake about growing these this year, they are in fact Gill's Golden Pippin, the TS didn't germinate this year.

  • #4
    Click image for larger version

Name:	stripecustmarr.JPG
Views:	23
Size:	59.8 KB
ID:	15297

    The photo at the top shows the striping developing nicely only 2 weeks later on 15 August. And my hand for scale. This is a fairly large fruit. And this is about the final size.

    The Custard Marrows are a group of interesting shaped and coloured summer squashes (cucurbita pepo) that are very ancient. There was one appearing in a painting from centuries ago, these must have been some of the first new world squashes to be brought back and grown in the old world. This year I am growing Striped Custard Marrows. The picture shows a half grown fruit and with a little imagination I can see the first hint of striping appearing.

    Click image for larger version  Name:	striped custard marrow.JPG Views:	37 Size:	2.30 MB ID:	14969
    Last edited by Galina; 15-08-2021, 15:15.

    Comment


    • jayb
      jayb commented
      Editing a comment
      Gorgeous shape. How big do they get?

    • Galina
      Galina commented
      Editing a comment
      Not that big. Last year's Golden Marbre ended up nearly a foot across, these are more like an orange in size, well a funny shaped orange.

    • Jang
      Jang commented
      Editing a comment
      I’ve been picking Golden Marbre at about seven inches across. A foot seems prodigious! Did you water loads?

  • #5
    My squash jungle is causing some confusion although the good side of the profuse growth is that there are a lot of good-sized squash developing.

    I have one plant of Sibley and one plant of Blue Banana.

    I take it that the first photos are of Sibley but would very much like to receive confirmation or objection. The squash in photos 2 and 3 are about 15" long. I'm also assuming that the last photo is of Blue Banana.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_4213.JPG
Views:	51
Size:	3.27 MB
ID:	14999
    Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_4212.JPG
Views:	50
Size:	4.87 MB
ID:	15001
    Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_4211.JPG
Views:	53
Size:	5.56 MB
ID:	15002

    Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_4214.JPG
Views:	47
Size:	4.13 MB
ID:	15005
    Attached Files

    Comment


    • Galina
      Galina commented
      Editing a comment
      Only one plant of each, sorry I missed that you had written that. In this case all grey must be Sibley, even if the shape is not quite right and all green must be Blue Banana, even though that does not quite fit the name.

      Well a Google picture search of Guatemalan Blue Banana reveals that it is definitely stripey and that it can have a pot belly. I think that explains everything. Green and striped is Blue Banana, grey is Sibley. https://www.google.com/search?q=guat...w=1242&bih=568
      Last edited by Galina; 02-08-2021, 05:44.

    • Jang
      Jang commented
      Editing a comment
      Taking up your comment about variation in squash varieties, Galina, I've established that of my first four photos above, nos two and three are definitely on the same plant. So they clearly show similarity of colouring but difference in shape. I take it that they are both Sibley as the one is so pot-bellied, so I guess Sibley can be more or sometimes less bellied.

    • Galina
      Galina commented
      Editing a comment
      Yes that is right. There is quite a bit of variability inherent in squash. I have handpollinated another Striped Custard Marrow and that one has a much bigger protrusion. Both shapes are within the' normal' spectrum of Striped Custard Marrow. If I deem it excessive, I would not use that second fruit for future seeds. You can easily select a Blue Banana from your Sibley. It only takes a few generations of selfing, ie using a female and male from the same plant.

  • #6
    Likely a Guatemalan Blue/Blue Banana, pretty sure it's not the North Carolina Candy Roaster. Perhaps not as stripy as the ones above?

    Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG_5126.JPG Views:	25 Size:	316.3 KB ID:	15020
    Last edited by jayb; 05-08-2021, 07:44. Reason: Edit name from Gratemalan Blue Banana to Guatemalan to reflect name on packet sown.

    Comment


    • jayb
      jayb commented
      Editing a comment
      On checking my seed packet name it's actually Guatemalan Blue, and says it is an heirloom from Guatemala.
      Blue Banana seeds are from Reel Seeds and on the packet they have noted it is also known as Guatemalan Blue.
      I think it likely there is more than one strain around and also true that it can be classed as an American heirloom too as it will have been grown there for a very long time. But it does look like it originated from Guatemala. I think also Candy, Pink Banana are also originally from this region.
      Out of interest where did you source your seeds from?
      I don’t as yet know if I have more than one plant growing. Perhaps we can compare the fruits later on?

    • Jang
      Jang commented
      Editing a comment
      Thanks for clearing that up.
      My seeds were from Real Seeds and I had forgotten that they say it is also known as Guatemalan Blue. So we are growing the same variety in fact and yes, it will be good to compare the fruits and see how similar the strains are.

      I grew from the same packet last year and the one squash produced - the plant didn’t have a good start in life - had no really discernible striping.

      Where were your seeds from?

    • Galina
      Galina commented
      Editing a comment
      There are two things to note. All squash have a much wider variation within them than much other veg. And if one fruit is on the wide side of variation (for example if I had selfed that very colourful Buttercup that looked more like a Turk's Turban) after a while I could, just by selection, call it a different variety. What if we were to take our least pot bellied Sibleys (and you have a candidate for that Jang) and selected a Blue Banana from that? With Squash that is particularly easy because it is not genetically so narrow, especially not the older varieties. My seeds were from the long defunct Abundant Life Seed Foundation. The other example is my Queensland Blue. Right shape, but never did it attain the sizes that they do in Oz and it stayed stubbornly green, rather than blue. Is this a different strain that nature selected for me, or a new variety. It is clear that photos of QB from hotter countries look very different.

  • #7
    Bylinka,
    I loved these when I grew them a few years back, early to start fruiting and a fair set. From memory, they weren't a winter long storer, but the taste was great and really attractive ripe fruit. I'm looking forward to these, hope they are as good as I remember! Seeds for these plants are a different source to previous Bylinka thread https://www.growingfoodsavingseeds.c...bylinka-squash

    Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG_5123.JPG Views:	0 Size:	301.5 KB ID:	15022

    Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG_5125.JPG Views:	0 Size:	254.2 KB ID:	15023
    Last edited by jayb; 01-08-2021, 06:58.

    Comment


    • Galina
      Galina commented
      Editing a comment
      Thank you for that description. Fortunately they freeze well and a newly started Sweet Meat means a lot of packets for the freezer. .

    • Jang
      Jang commented
      Editing a comment
      I've never frozen squash and have ended up with quite a lot of mouldy leftover portions. I suppose that as they're available from )October to July it hasn't seemed worthwhile - but I hate the waste. The chickens are interested only in the seeds. 🙁

      Do you cut them into chunks and freeze them raw? Are they then good for casseroles, curries etc?

    • Galina
      Galina commented
      Editing a comment
      Yes, chunks or larger slices. Chunks can go into any fried meat in a frying pan, say you fry chops, just place a good handful of chunks for everybody in with them. An extra veg without any effort and ready when the meat is. Equally good in any casserole. I also tend to put a pound of carrots, several half onions in with the slow cooker and halfway through cooking, I add the squash. Really good baked with a roast, but needs only half the time of baked carrots, parsnips or potatoes. Great on a vegetable tray bake too. All from fresh or frozen, doesn't make a lot of difference and I don't blanch either. Many squash don't need peeling, so easy to get ready for freezing too.

  • #8
    Iran Squash.
    First time growing this variety and I'm not expecting anything taste-wise, I think they are more of a looker. I initially got these as I wondered if I had been sent them by mistake in place of Bylinka as the fruits were so pretty.

    Seems to be setting fruit ok and judging by the unusual cluster of flower buds I have a few of this variety growing but not that easy to tell amongst all the leaves.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_5122.JPG
Views:	45
Size:	351.1 KB
ID:	15025

    Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_5150.JPG
Views:	49
Size:	309.3 KB
ID:	15026

    Comment


    • Galina
      Galina commented
      Editing a comment
      When it comes to good looking storing squash. I once had a buttercup that changed in storage to colours more like a Turk's Turban, but with all the buttercup flavour. Just the one though and haven't seen that ever again.
      Last edited by Galina; 03-08-2021, 07:07.

    • jayb
      jayb commented
      Editing a comment
      What a shame it was just the one, it sounds like it was a winner on several fronts.
      I think a similar thought was why I bought some of the more colourful types, an idea to get a better-tasting but colourful squash.

    • Jang
      Jang commented
      Editing a comment
      I love Uchiki Kuri because it seems to me to combine the two.

  • #9
    Two winter squashes not sure of the variety's Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_0167.JPG
Views:	51
Size:	2.34 MB
ID:	15038 Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_0177.JPG
Views:	52
Size:	4.20 MB
ID:	15039 that are on the plot.

    Comment


    • Jang
      Jang commented
      Editing a comment
      The first looks very bonny. It looks almost ripe already. How large is it?

    • Galina
      Galina commented
      Editing a comment
      The contrast between the netting over orange and the green stem is very pretty.

    • jayb
      jayb commented
      Editing a comment
      Gorgeous looking squash, love those spots
      You look in for a good harvest.

  • #10
    Thelma Sanders Sweet Potato. My first time growing this popular winter squash. Looking forward to trying it for taste.

    I’d be interested to know from anyone who’s grown it how long they’ve found it stores for.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	6B99B49F-B258-4000-A318-03DCE7417079.jpeg
Views:	45
Size:	969.9 KB
ID:	15044

    Comment


    • Galina
      Galina commented
      Editing a comment
      Dense, fine grained flesh with good flavour. It is just a different thing to a marrow entirely although both are cucurbita pepo.

    • Jang
      Jang commented
      Editing a comment
      Sounds good. And would you leave it till just before the first frost to harvest?

    • Galina
      Galina commented
      Editing a comment
      Maybe a bit before, then a stint on a sunny windowsill to 'cure' before storing. Maybe slightly earlier also if you have fruit on the plants that you want to ripen off, so that the plant can get all energy into those to be ripened fruits.

  • #11
    Honey boat,
    I've only grown these once before and had a nice crop.
    There looks to be fruit forming on several plants, this one is just a baby at the moment. I'm looking forward to these.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_5112.JPG
Views:	37
Size:	323.4 KB
ID:	15070


    Comment


    • Galina
      Galina commented
      Editing a comment
      Homeyboat is a reselected Delicata as far as I know. A bit tricky because it is described as a heirloom squash. This is another autumn squash and very similar to Thelma Sanders. And very sweet indeed. Halved and baked with a Sunday chicken, oh yum. I understand in the USA, they even put extra honey into the halves.

    • jayb
      jayb commented
      Editing a comment
      That is a sweet tooth.
      I understood it to be a reselection of Delicata too. Some places list it as Delicata Honey Boat/Honeyboat others just HB. Perhaps a marketing ploy or some such thing.

  • #12
    I think this must be a North Georgia Candy Roaster, I don't remember growing this variety before. The vines are a bit thuggish and are stretching out into the sweet corn patch as well as invading the sweetpeas.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_5127.JPG
Views:	40
Size:	223.0 KB
ID:	15072

    Comment


    • Jang
      Jang commented
      Editing a comment
      Striking and unusually white! My White Boer (below) is much less white as yet.

    • jayb
      jayb commented
      Editing a comment
      They are quite light + bright and really stand out amongst the mass of stems and leaves.

  • #13
    Flat White Boer/Old White Boer. A South African maxima squash I believe. Not very white yet, certainly compared with North Georgia Candy Roaster, but I think it might lighten in colour as it matures.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	472B93D7-ABDA-493D-B375-62B7B0E3BDED.jpeg
Views:	35
Size:	891.7 KB
ID:	15096

    Comment


    • jayb
      jayb commented
      Editing a comment
      Isn't it interesting how some skin colours don't really alter, others darken and become more vibrant with age and then some lighten their skin colour. I guess a lot going on behind the scenes.

    • Galina
      Galina commented
      Editing a comment
      Yes storage colours are fascinating. I have grown Flat White Boer years ago and the storage colour was a bright pink with white netting all over. Really a looker.

    • Jang
      Jang commented
      Editing a comment
      I look forward to seeing whether I have the pink/white netting. Sounds amazing.

  • #14
    Queensland Blue carries on the colour changing theme as the bluish colour is still to emerge.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	2A400F7D-96AE-4285-919F-4C9A7E8CFD59.jpeg
Views:	34
Size:	921.1 KB
ID:	15120

    Comment


    • Galina
      Galina commented
      Editing a comment
      Queensland Blue seem to stay green for a very long time. I think you need heat to really bring out the blue. I have also never got the size that they have in Oz. But another great tasting one, with dry chestnut flesh.

    • jayb
      jayb commented
      Editing a comment
      I love these, so tasty and so so pretty, lucky you.
      I possibly have one of these vines (and a NG Candy Roaster) making a break for it down the Sweetcorn bed they have got about 3/4 of the way down the length already.

  • #15
    Speckled Hound F1, my first time growing these, they are in with the colourfuls. Plants seem busy. There seem to be two of these plants growing, both have an initial set close to the stem before branching out, I don't know as yet if they have more fruits set further out.

    Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG_5148.JPG Views:	8 Size:	333.8 KB ID:	15237



    Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG_5153.JPG Views:	7 Size:	261.2 KB ID:	15238
    Last edited by jayb; 14-08-2021, 06:21. Reason: edit to add F1

    Comment


    • Jang
      Jang commented
      Editing a comment
      Yes, they look very productive. Difficult to get the scale. How big is each fruit about?

    • jayb
      jayb commented
      Editing a comment
      I forgot to add they are an F1 variety, I'll edit post.
      The fruits look to be medium size, I'll see if I can get a better picture to give an idea.

    • jayb
      jayb commented
      Editing a comment
      It was raining this morning so didn't get out with my camera, but using the bending over double in the middle of the squash patch while balancing on one leg hand alongside hand measurement, I estimate the larger ones are around 8-10'' across.
Working...
X