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  • Bylinka Squash

    I got seeds for these from Baker Creek, I liked the look of them, I'm a bit of a sucker for blue or grey squash. Bred in the Ukraine, they apparently have good resistance to powdery mildew, which is a bonus.
    Early days but I'm really impressed so far, they are just getting down to the business of producing fruit. All I need are a few male flowers to make it even better.

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  • #2
    I came across some info on Idig forum, which I hope they won't mind I've copied here http://www.idigmygarden.com/forums/s...06#post1021906

    “I did a search and I think that Bylinka Squash is also called "Bylina" and is in the Cucurbita maxima family. Here is some information I translated from a Chech website about the squash:

    According Ukrainians it is the earliest variety of the species C. maxima. Selected in Dnipropetrovsk Research Center bostannite vegetables and crops. Data on their pumpkins include: dry matter - 13.2%, sugar - 8.3%, pectin - 1.9%, Vitamin C - 18.2 mg%, carotene - 15-20 mg / 100 g. Their average weight 6-8 kg. On paper, the variety is resistant to powdery mildew. But I doubt it, but I can not be sure because in 2008 the disease was not a significant problem for the other varieties. The flesh is very moist, but not watery. The taste is surprisingly sweet, overall I would say that is very good, and for the early variety right is excellent. Keeping is average.”
    I'd certainly agree the variety appears to be an early one as so far it has set the best of the varieties I'm growing and it seems very happy growing here. I've pollinated a few female flowers, hopefully I'll end up with some fresh seed.

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    • #3
      Bylinka progress
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      • #4
        The last picture with all the water droplets looks so good. Had a sneaky peak at Baker Creek's website and the description of the flesh qualities is very good indeed. I also liked the mature pictures of the light grey post harvest colour with a pink hue. Looking forward to eating quality reports.

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        • #5
          I liked the grey with pink spots description too.
          Looking forward to eating quality reports
          I really hope it's going to be good, they are doing so well so far, a lovely easy plant.

          One of the plants had a white seed coat rather than brown, it's a bit behind the regular Bylinka's but the fruit so far look to be similar. Maybe as they mature they will look a bit different?

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          • #6
            Have never heard of a squash having both seed coat colours. May well be a different variety. Two for the price of one .............. if you can work out what the rogue one is

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            • #7
              That's what I thought, which was why I was a bit surprised to see the developing fruit looking similar. I had wondered too if something had been cross pollinate along the line, but it's unlikely they wouldn't have spotted the seed difference when harvesting? Saying that I had the rogue Papa de Rola from Baker Creek seeds as well.

              Oh gosh, Baker Creek have a huge range of squash, so it might be quite difficult to identify them, plus I think they also have people growing for them, they might not be one they stock? Reminds me I must have another look, see how they are looking.

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              • Galina
                Galina commented
                Editing a comment
                Not Baker Creek , but I had a seed for a different lettuce from Adaptive seeds. Identified most likely as Devil's Ears. Luckily they don't have too many lettuces. And now it is flowering, hopefully seed soon. Provided it still looks just like Devil's Ears and all plants are the same next year, we may conclude a serendipitous seed packet contamination. Good luck working out your odd one.

              • jayb
                jayb commented
                Editing a comment
                Nice one, good detecting.

            • #8
              Bylinka white seed off type,

              Early baby fruit which look quite similar to the one in the first post.
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              Getting bigger
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              Last edited by jayb; 04-08-2015, 09:57.

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              • #9
                Another Bylinka fruit from another plant, slightly different to the ones in post 3, maybe the greener colour comes with age or perhaps just variable fruit types.

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                • #10
                  Yes they do look very similar indeed. Just trying to remember ............ if you cross a white seeded maxima with a brown seeded maxima, you get all brown in the F1, brown being dominant. Can anybody confirm this? Can't remember where I read this at the moment. If white is the odd one out, then the cross must be F2 or later. And an F2 plant would be visually different. You will see more when the odd one develops a bit further, but it does look similar at the moment.

                  Regarding squash appearance. I have always found much less uniformity especially in maxima squash. They can be quite different from each other. Stripes change with development and with environmental conditions, 'crowns' can be very different from hardly any to quite pronounced etc. Even storage colour varies. Some hardly change at all, others turn bright pink or in the case of Buttercups, some can turn very colourful like decorative turban squashes. So a bit greener or a bit less green I don't think signifies anything. Different seed colour on the other hand is used as one of the characteristics to describe varieties and distinguish them from each other.

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                  • #11
                    I can't find anything for seed coat colour gene, only seedless. I wish I'd taken a photo now to remind me how they looked. It will be interesting to see what the seeds are like this year, I'd like to self one but it's not happening at the moment.

                    I had another look at Baker creek's varieties and I wondered about Iran Squash they look like they could be fairly similar http://www.rareseeds.com/iran-squash/ but no idear of size or seed colour.

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                    • Galina
                      Galina commented
                      Editing a comment
                      I hope not! Iran is really only a decorative squash, one of the few maxima that I have tried and was really disappointed in - the other was Lakota. Whereas Bylinka is supposed to be very tasty.

                    • jayb
                      jayb commented
                      Editing a comment
                      Oh dear, hopefully not then, I was going on shape and colour as a possible variety. I don't suppose you remember what the seeds were like or have any left to check? And what size do the fruits grow to?
                      What a shame about flavour they both look so pretty!

                  • #12
                    No sorry, bought in 2003 from SSE, it is just possible that I have a few left in the bottom of the freezer, but can't get to right now. They were fairly large, one of the largest grown here. Next freezer seed 'expedition' I will check.

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                    • #13
                      Thanks and no worries, if they are a biggy it's not them as both Bylinka and white seeded Bylinka are looking to be the same size and aren't going to be biggies I think. I'm sure I remember seeing someone is growing Iran this year, I think at A4A, can't remember who though.

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                      • #14
                        S'me. Will have a look at seed colour when OH is awake, though I think I remember them as white-seeded. My plant was hit by both slugs and early powdery mildew and looks awful. I don't think it will be producing anything this year.

                        Possibly a good thing if they are not good eating.

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                        • #15
                          Ahh, I knew someone was growing them, I remember looking them up and thinking how lovely they looked! Shame they are not doing so good for you, perhaps not well suited to the UK? Powdery mildew is awful once it gets going.

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