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  • Garden Organic 2022 Members Experiments

    https://www.gardenorganic.org.uk/tes...-bio-stimulant

    A topic of personal interest as the fight against flea beetle is bitter and ongoing, however I cannot seem to sign up for it without being redirected to log in (despite being logged in!)
    If any of you are signing up could you let me know whether you encounter the same issue?

  • #2
    Yes, I have exactly the same. An email seems worth writing. It might be a long time before they wonder why no-one has signed up!

    Like you I find the battle against flea beetle is a significant one, so this seems to hold out an interesting possibility. I would have thought though that coated seed would be expensive to produce, or perhaps an idea might be that one could coat the seed oneself. For the experiment the seed apparently is coming ready coated.

    Comment


    • #3
      I use cloches which cuts down flea beetle significantly on seedlings. On older plants they don't do so much damage. Worst on rocket, but we don't mind eating a few leaves with holes in. It is just seedlings which they decimate and kill.

      Gardeners of old used a contraption consisting of a wheel and a sticky surface by the side of the wheel. The wheel is a bit like a surveyor's trundle wheel. They trundled this along the bed and the disturbed flea beetles jump up (as they tend to do) and get stuck on the glue. Never seen one in action apart from on tv, possibly an old Geoff Hamilton method.

      What is the coating on the seed?

      What is the weather correlation for seedlings? I think it is worse during summer without much rain and not much of an issue at rainy times. Autumn and early spring sowings tend to be unaffected.

      This is a simpler method than constructing a wheel, but based on the same idea.

      "Make a sticky trap
      Exploit the beetles’ habit of jumping by catching them with a sticky trap. Coat a piece of card with grease, such as insect barrier glue, leaving a clean strip along one edge. Brush the clean edge of the card over the top of your plants – when the beetles hop into the air they’ll stick to the grease. Repeat as necessary but don’t leave the sticky trap among your plants as it could trap bees and other pollinators, and even birds and bats." https://www.gardenersworld.com/how-t...s/flea-beetle/
      Last edited by Galina; 15-01-2022, 08:08.

      Comment


      • triffid
        triffid commented
        Editing a comment
        Wouldn't one have to keep the plastic tunnel cloche open for ventilation? - how do you keep them from getting in that way?

      • Jang
        Jang commented
        Editing a comment
        Interesting that I haven't had an algal build-up on enviromesh. Perhaps my atmosphere is drier.

        I grow a lot of brassicas in 4'-4'6" wide beds. Over the years I've invested in 16mm and 13mm aluminium tubing (https://www.gardening-naturally.com/...luminium-tubes) and build-a-balls to construct cages of low and medium height (the taller ones for Brussel sprouts and PSB etc), which can be covered with mesh, fleece, debris netting or butterfly netting depending on the need at the time. I still find though that when I want to sow just an odd row of radishes or rocket in a seed bed, protecting from flea beetle is a pain.

      • Galina
        Galina commented
        Editing a comment
        Strangely not as much as through the open bottleneck, but I do have flat plastic end bits to close the cloches too, although they are by no means a snug fit. And when I have a plastic overhang it gets draped over the sides and a bit of soil on top. Does not need much ventilation for a short run and I don't keep it on for long either as it is mainly tiny seedlings that are at risk. With fleece that is not an issue at all.
        Last edited by Galina; 21-01-2022, 09:07.

    • #4
      The form seems to be working now!

      Comment


      • Galina
        Galina commented
        Editing a comment
        And reading the experiment is slightly strange. Why 'salad seeds' unless it is a brassica type salad. Is this also meant to deter slugs or as they say, mainly flea beetles. Because flea beetles do not attack my lettuce seedlings at all, slugs on the other hand ............... If 'salad' means lettuce then the experiment will be a success as there will be no flee beatles
        .

      • triffid
        triffid commented
        Editing a comment
        Now I can't remember where I saw it written, but I could swear they mentioned some kind of salad brassica like mustard or rocket on one of the pages.

    • #5
      By the way, did anyone receive a confirmation email when they signed up for this? I'm wondering whether I was registered.

      Comment


      • triffid
        triffid commented
        Editing a comment
        Yes, it arrived a couple of days ago but I haven't yet had the chance to read the protocol in depth. Something to do this evening!

      • triffid
        triffid commented
        Editing a comment
        It seems fairly straightfoward, and very little space required, but the daily observation shall keep us on our toes.

      • Jang
        Jang commented
        Editing a comment
        Yes, and three 10” pots took a bit of sorting out. One rather broken one will just about complete my set.
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