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  • Harvested today

    I could have added peppers, another squash and runnerbeans, which were also harvested today. Not bad for November. I am glad that the little greasy beans (Mallie Isaacs) made it, as they weren't doing anything with last year's early frost. I already have taken the biggest pods for seed ripening indoors last week. The most mature are for seed ripening, but most are for eating. The caulis are definitely pathetic (rabbits or something else has been at the plants inside a giant cloche), but together with the broccoli they will make a meal. Still a lot of tomatoes from the greenhouse, but there were also several from the plants outside, although most of the plants are now composted and frost is forecast.

  • #2
    Your harvest looks fantastic
    Indeed, what a difference the weather makes. I brought in butternuts last week, not sure they had been growing much recently but the plants are still flowering despite all the wind and rain recently.
    Love the Greasy's, I should have planted more this year!

    Comment


    • Galina
      Galina commented
      Editing a comment
      No butternuts this year, but Sibley, Buttercup and Chersonskaya, as well as Tuffy. All on the windowsill.

    • jayb
      jayb commented
      Editing a comment
      What a lovely sounding selection, I haven't heard of Chersonskaya, have you sampled them yet?
      I love Sibleys, but didn't grow any this year, boo hoo!

    • Galina
      Galina commented
      Editing a comment
      Chersonskaya came from Real Seeds a long time ago. They were quite variable - a white type and a green type and I don't know which is the real one. I asked Ben, but did not get a full explanation, maybe they had variable types as well. However, all of them are very heavy compared to their size with dense dark yellow, sweet flesh. Unfortunately I did not catch any to hand pollinate this year. If you look on www, they are all very variable most are much larger than I can grow. I have no idea which is the correct one, but I like the heavy, sweet type of squash with thin skin. Because I don't know which is the correct one, I won't share seeds and add to the confusion.
      Last edited by Galina; 05-12-2014, 09:39.

  • #3
    Harvested today: The very last tomatoes from the greenhouse, some still green. With any luck the last few will go on the starter for Christmas. The bright red Alberto Locoto hot peppers are still going strong and more to come. Found one last Nardello's sweet pepper. PSB that is flowering now and little broccoli florets. The cauli is a bit pathetic, but celery and savoy cabbage are looking good. Slight frosts have not touched the chard yet either. Still a good harvest. I could have added land cress, leeks, endive, lettuce, spring onions and rocket..

    Comment


    • Galina
      Galina commented
      Editing a comment
      .......................... and kale of course. Forgot about the super perennial Daubenton's and Grandpa Maycock's Collards. There are also some Brussels and parsnips, but they won't be touched before Christmas. Must get the last of the beetroot dug too - I was so dismayed at the earlier mouse damage in the roots, I haven't checked whether the survivors have any roots at all, but the leaves are looking ok and they are also good to eat if no roots. I shall never understand why they go after beetroots but leave chard roots alone..

    • jayb
      jayb commented
      Editing a comment
      Looks fantastic, hard to believe the time of year. Mice adore beetroot here too, blooming things, also the succulent leaf heart of chard, but the same they leave the roots

    • Galina
      Galina commented
      Editing a comment
      The Kiwano aka African Horned Cucumber are also ripening slowly. Green ones in the conservatory are slowly showing a bit of yellow on some of the fruits. When I take one of those into the warmth of the house, it gets bright orange within days. They do taste very good but some might want to sprinkle a bit of sugar on the lime green flesh. Quite a surprising crop, have never had much luck with so-called winter melons, but these fill the late fresh fruit gap nicely (but I still want to learn how to grow melons properly)

  • #4
    Winter Harvest.early February

    The very last Rocoto Peppers (Alberto Locoto), which are storing in a cool place. Interesting, these are much less hot and most have brownish seeds rather than black, although the peppers themselves are red. The kale on the right is Taunton Deane Cottager's kale, one of the Daubenton kales that flower hardly at all and are propagated by cuttings. The purple leaf stems are cut and steamed, the huge leaves (after blanching) make excellent cabbage rolls. These Babington leeks are very thin. This patch is so packed I really must thin them to get larger individual plants and not just cut above the cloves for speed of harvesting. The celery are still going, although a bit grotty. Brussel Sprout top on the left and kale shoots. Dlouhy Bily (Long White) parsnips and a Sibley squash in its pink final storage colour complete the picture.
    Last edited by Galina; 02-02-2015, 09:03.

    Comment


    • Galina
      Galina commented
      Editing a comment
      ........................ and I could have added potatoes from storage, onions/shallots and garlic. There is fruit in the freezer and in kilner jars. Also lettuce and other greens in the greenhouse. These are currently surviving rather than growing and I am not weakening the plants by harvesting. Best look the lamb's lettuces and the land cress. To supplement the winter harvest and provide variety, we also have frozen veg of many types, tucked away when we had gluts of them. There are cherry tomatoes (which I just drop into the pan when we enjoy a full English breakfast - they defrost nicely in the time the other ingredients cook), broadies, green beans and peas. Also a few pounds of shelled beans, which I just drop into spaghetti sauce or similar and give them a ten minutes boil.

  • #5
    Easter harvest.

    Easter is the time for our first real salad mainly from the greenhouse, with lettuce, rocket, landcress, broadleaf endive, lamb's lettuce, cress and spring onions. I sowed these turnips (variety Petrowski) late in autumn for spring greens, but they obliged with nice roots too, which must be eaten before the plants start shooting and flowering. The chard outgrew the deer nibbling. The first sprouting broccolis and the first few short sticks of rhubarb (just for a taste) are also Easter treats. The Daubenton kales are producing prolifically and we are also still eating winter squash (here Uchiki Kuri). We also have celery which came through winter very well. Also in store are still onions, shallots, garlic and potatoes.

    Comment


    • #6
      Lovely
      All looks beautiful and lush. Really like the look of your Petowski turnips, skin is lovely and I bet they are tender

      Comment


      • Galina
        Galina commented
        Editing a comment
        Yes they were. Obviously much more greens than roots, but these were grown over winter and only intended as greens in the first place. Yes Petrowski are yellow skinned and a little smaller than most. They are from my own seeds (originally from Thomas Etty) and the first ones were sown late August and grown over winter (double cloched) for seed. I just wonder whether there has been a little adaptation going on. I really did not expect roots from turnips grown late September, lifted the cloche and under the by now rather crowded leafy growth I found the roots. Just caught them in time really before starting to stretch.
        Last edited by Galina; 07-04-2015, 11:10.

      • jayb
        jayb commented
        Editing a comment
        What a useful sort and a treat at the beginning of April. You might be right about them adapting to your climate, they seem very happy. Will you grow them again for a overwintered crop?

      • Galina
        Galina commented
        Editing a comment
        Oh definitely! I usually grow turnips after something comes out - either after the garlic or after the early potatoes.
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