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Harvesting 2018

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  • Harvesting 2018

    First harvest of the year coriander leaves.

  • #2
    They look very nice. What dish are you using them for?

    Here we now have a good quantity of Three Cornered Leeks that have put on a huge lot of growth with the late winter sunshine. Also mainly a garnish, a nice fresh addition to a top off a meat dish. A bit like chives, but a broader leaf and a very slight tang of garlic.

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    • clumsy
      clumsy commented
      Editing a comment
      The dish was Aloo matar curry which translate to a simple dish of potatoes and peas curry dish.

    • Galina
      Galina commented
      Editing a comment
      Sounds yummy, Clumsy.

  • #3
    Harvested some more coriander,plus took a photo of the garlic.

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    • #4
      To say we are 'harvesting' is perhaps overstating it. But finally our rhubarb is moving and we have pulled the first still very short stalks for a little taste. There isn't much but with raspberries from the freezer, it will be a taste.. After this never-ending winter, perhaps spring is on the way at last.
      Last edited by Galina; 01-04-2018, 18:26.

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      • clumsy
        clumsy commented
        Editing a comment
        At least you got something just to taste and remind you spring is on it's way.

    • #5
      I'm just been harvesting coriander nothing else at the moment.

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      • #6
        Well I must say I am impressed. I stuck a lot of coriander in a pot in the propagator and it did not come up for ages. Then I remembered. Bashed a handful of seeds and sowed them into a pot in the conservatory. Came up in next to no time. The original pot is also doing well but splitting the seeds makes a huge difference. Thank you Clumsy. Have carefully transplanted some outside in small clumps, so not to disturb the roots and also looking forward to the first harvest - hopefully in a week or so.

        Other than that, the kales are doing so much better now. More foliage and the flowering perennial Portuguese kale is producing lots of buds. I have never seen flowers on the perennial kales, but my variegated Daubenton's is getting buds. That's rare. As the plant may die after flowering, I am also taking cuttings and rooting these to keep it going vegetatively. Well the rhubarb is now in full swing, full length sticks, some well over an inch thick. Rocket, turnip greens, Babington leek, three cornered leek are all in full production. Still have apples, garlic, onions, winter squash storing, but the beans and peas in the freezer are now down to the last few packets. Still got two shoe boxes full of spuds too.

        Hope others are finding goodies from their plots too. As this is supposed to be the hungry gap, there is still plenty being harvested here.

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        • clumsy
          clumsy commented
          Editing a comment
          As you know apart from coriander nothing else from the allotment. Tomorrow will be a big day will be planting most things like potatoes,onions and shallots. If time is on my side then sow beetroot,plus coriander. Will update with photos.

      • #7
        I had an unexpected bonus harvest today. Before pea planting, I just scratch over last year's dug bed and then I found this. They were relatively close to one of the large perennial cabbages, which may explain why I didn't dig them up in autumn. A nice portion of perfect Snookie potatoes. And being Snookie which is a late sprouting variety, they were still in perfect condition too!

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        • clumsy
          clumsy commented
          Editing a comment
          Wow fresh potatoes looking lovely very envious.

      • #8
        I've harvested some garlic bulbil. I sometimes harvest the garlic scape use the bulbils to produce some extra garlic. Will be harvesting the main crop either tomorrow or saturday.

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        • #9
          I think mine will need another month in the ground. These bulbs look very red. Fresh garlic does taste so good and has a pungency that is lost a bit with stored garlic. What will you plant after the garlic?

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          • #10
            We are still harvesting a lot of kale and chard and freezing some too. Soon the leaves will become tough and the chard will go to seed. New are mangetout peas. I had wind damage and pigeon damage but also nice peas and usually peas recover and grow again from side shoots. We like making Rogon Gosh curry and that used stored onions, the last of the frozen tomatoes (unfortunately I had to supplement with a tin of tomatoes there), and ............ our own coriander. So tasty

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            • #11
              After the garlic will be more courgettes this year. Normally grow more kidney beans but this time I have tooooo many courgette plants instead.

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              • #12
                Good plan. When I have too many of those, I like to slice them and fry in olive oil and garlic, probably add a bit of chili or an onion. Then stick that into a takeaway container (the type you can microwave) and in the freezer when they have cooled down. A very easy veggie side and lovely during winter. In my book you can't have too many courgettes.

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                • #13
                  Garlic all harvested now.

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                  • #14
                    The peas are really good now, but unfortunately because of the heat the leaves are starting to deteriorate. This is very early. I hope with a lot of watering I can keep them going for a bit longer. However: Here are some of what is being collected for the kitchen. At the top Court Estate Gold, these later ones aren't quite as large as the early ones. They are a mangetout pea. All the others are snap peas. The golden sickle shaped ones are Charlie's Goldsnap, the green ones and smaller purple ones are Sugarbeth Snaps (bred by Jayb) and the larger purple ones are Sugar Magnolia. Again these later Sugar Magnolias are smaller than the early ones. All very yummy and apart from Sugar Magnolia which was bred by Alan Kapuler, they were bred by members of this group.

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                    • clumsy
                      clumsy commented
                      Editing a comment
                      Wow looking good with the peas. I've harvested all of mine last week and shelled frozen to be used when required. Plus gave some to local charity. This time since I had the netting on no damage to the peas inside. Will use this method again next year.

                  • #15
                    The chilli are getting bigger day by day.

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                    • Galina
                      Galina commented
                      Editing a comment
                      Mine are getting taller too, but no chilis on yet. They are looking good. Do you wait until they get red or harvest at this stage for an early taste?
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