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Harvesting 2019

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  • Harvesting 2019

    It may be deepest winter, but the plot is still producing. I got this little lot before the arctic blast came. Two types of kale, red mustard, turnip, cress, chard and a small celeriac.

  • #2
    I've also harvested kale and rocket bit of fenugreek last week from the allotment.

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    • Galina
      Galina commented
      Editing a comment
      I used to be a bare bed from late October to March gardener. Until I changed to a 4 season gardener. I am still stupidly proud of my winter harvests. I am very glad that it seems to be catching on and there are now more people who garden over winter and inspire others. It is so uplifting to see your greenhouse, Clumsy and all other winter successes.
      Last edited by Galina; 02-02-2019, 00:18.

  • #3
    Gosh what a haul! They must taste lovely and sweet too what with the cold weather?

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    • Galina
      Galina commented
      Editing a comment
      Not so sure about that. The red mustard does pack a punch. And the chillis (from the conservatory) are also still surprisingly hot. But it is certainly true for some veg. The kale is lovely and sweet. And the turnip tops are also really tasty and tender, make quite a different veg from the turnip roots.

    • clumsy
      clumsy commented
      Editing a comment
      I'm not convinced when they say chilli's need hot weather to be taste hot. I think it depends on the watering, I believe if treated poorly they become hot and the plants defence is triggered to protect itself if you damage a stem or take leaves off. Great observation galina about the chilli's. Very envious of having fresh chilli's right know, all mine a frozen.

  • #4
    The kale I was harvesting today it's nice and sunny but very cold. Plus the photo of the potato plant that died from cold weather it did have a small potato and another very tiny one developing. I think I will plant some potato's early as august if I see some volunteers potato's growing again. Broad beans have fallen down I need to tie them up next time. Plus a photo of the frozen greenhouse I always mean to take a photo when it looks like this to show how cold it gets.

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    • triffid
      triffid commented
      Editing a comment
      That kale looks marvelous

    • Galina
      Galina commented
      Editing a comment
      I agree. Is that actual ice on the greenhouse, Clumsy?
      Last edited by Galina; 06-03-2019, 15:41.

    • clumsy
      clumsy commented
      Editing a comment
      Yes it was ice the greenhouse was frozen.

  • #5
    Now in March we are still harvesting pretty much all the same things, with two additions. The fennel has tiny shoots (which I harvested probably far too early, but looking forward to a nice different taste), and the Portuguese kale has these lovely flowerbuds. The leaves started looking different, very old, no longer nice to eat and somewhat droopy, but several of these little shoots came out of the axils with flowerbuds on. A little bit like flowering broccoli. They are very yummy and there will be lots more in the next few weeks. We also have still stored apples, potatoes, onions, garlic and winter squashes. The buttercups (seeds were from Real Seeds) have turned somewhat colourful. They started off green, but now they are more stripey and there is sandy beige and even a bit of red coming through. Even the Sibley has changed from grey to a peculiar pinkish grey. Still storing well.

    Comment


    • clumsy
      clumsy commented
      Editing a comment
      Winter squash looking very unique. Just harvesting kale,rocket and some fenugreek from the greenhouse.

    • Galina
      Galina commented
      Editing a comment
      Yes they are a bit funky looking in their storage colours. Flavourwise still perfect. Last year we had the last squash in June. Nice to have kale, rocket and fenugreek still. And with your broad beans flowering, it won't be long until the first new veggies.
      Last edited by Galina; 07-03-2019, 14:51.

  • #6
    I have my overwintering turnips under scaffolding netting for brassica, not even full fleece. And that seems to have worked well. I also have one young plant of the Portuguese kale with the little flower sprouts under the netting for a bit more protection. When I got my first seeds for Portuguese from the Heritage Seed Library only one plant survived winter, so I am still a bit paranoid about young plants, but the older plants of this perennial kale type are very winter hardy. As I harvested a couple of turnips I noticed that the young plant also has flower shoots, which I picked. What a difference, they are so much bigger than those without protection. And the protection was only a bit of green netting, nothing more. I was very surprised that it made such a difference.

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    • clumsy
      clumsy commented
      Editing a comment
      The netting actually helps I noticed that last year it also protects plants from the weather and can provide bit of warmth.

    • Galina
      Galina commented
      Editing a comment
      Yes it must, to a much greater degree than I expected. And of course also protects from the pigeons, which are a pain. Last time I grew sprouting broccoli, a cold winter down to minus 16C got the lot. Now I wonder, had I constructed a high cage of some sort, whether that would have solved the problem. I then fleeced the nine star perennial cauliflower to keep it warmer and mice under the fleece gnawed stems and did huge damage. No evidence of damage under the netting.

  • #7
    Been harvesting the peas today.

    Comment


    • clumsy
      clumsy commented
      Editing a comment
      Nothing yet the flowers are dying so hopefully I should see some pods forming soon.

    • triffid
      triffid commented
      Editing a comment
      Impressive! When were these planted?

    • clumsy
      clumsy commented
      Editing a comment
      I think early/middle of November.

  • #8
    Broad beans are developing plus I think a mouse is coming into the greenhouse seen signs of digging plus a hole I put soil back yesterday today it was back open again.

    Comment


    • #9
      Oh yes some nice pods there and really early too. I have two lots of broad beans, one planted out but still small, the other not quite flowering yet.

      Mice in the greenhouse are a bother, but unless it is actually frosty you can make it less comfortable for them by leaving the doors open. Or flooding the hole with lots of water to make the whole access tunnel collapse. There are of course traps too.

      Comment


      • #10
        Harvested the rest of the peas in the greenhouse. Now just need to wait for the main harvest in June of the peas. In the empty space probably put melon,water melon or cucumber plants.

        Comment


        • Galina
          Galina commented
          Editing a comment
          Sown in November if I remember right, this was a very successful experiment. Enjoy these peas. I am looking forward to tasting the first peas. I have found a packet of peas and also a packet of beans in the freezer and they steamed were very welcome. A joy to see the bag with your peas. They are Winterkefe, is that right?

        • clumsy
          clumsy commented
          Editing a comment
          The winterkefe I was pick beginning of April and mangetout peas and these are provencal petite if you go back to post where I say the greenhouse is frozen you can see these peas were the potato plant died of cold. These peas were sown at the same time. Plus I have sown them outside as my maincrop also new variety to me because of early to mature.

      • #11
        Harvesting some radishes today.

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