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  • Micro Gemma

    Another Micro tomato for the winter garden. Micro Gemma was bred by the University of Florida and I was lucky enough to be gifted seeds of Gemma (and Micro Tina) several years ago from a very lovely lady called Jeannine. I think their size will be ideal for growing indoors over winter, though that is the compromise as being such a mini tomato they can only carry so much. They produce pretty little yellow cherry tomatoes with a fair taste, I've used them in a few breeding projects in previous years and would like to use them again.

    I'm pleased they have germinated so well, I wasn't expecting them too as the seeds are 7 or 8 years old. The picture was taken 7 days from sowing and I'll try and keep regular updates for them.

    Click image for larger version  Name:	018.jpg Views:	12 Size:	464.0 KB ID:	10221


    Last edited by jayb; 17-11-2019, 08:28.

  • #2
    Your doing well with the propagator everything is germinating it seems 7 day. So you have red and yellow varieties growing?

    Comment


    • jayb
      jayb commented
      Editing a comment
      Sadly not everything, I have a few not coming up at all and some a little slower, but overall germination is good. Yes yellow and red, I have a couple of Micro Tina seedlings and hopefully, I'll have some Micro Tom when I resow which will both be red. I also have some Venus seeds, which on the packet look to be orangey coloured, so maybe have yellow, orange and red, plus the blue. It will be good to add some more colours in time.

  • #3
    Tomato seeds stored decently will last 9 years easily, at a push ten or more years. As these are seeds saved by yourself, I would think that 7 or 8 years is well within expected seed viability time. It is different with commercial seeds, because we never know how old they were when they were packaged.

    Comment


    • #4
      Good advice, I do notice a difference with some of my saved seed germination rates, I guess individual variety could have a factor but I think I need to look at how I process and store my seeds more. I also really need to start storing a back up in the freezer. I read a recently (I think by Kieth Mueller, I'll find a link) that in fact, really ripe tomatoes may not be the best to save for seed, this may influence some of my seeds. Tina, Gemma and Tom were all saved either the same year or one before, Tina and Gemma are at 100% up and running within 7 days, Micro Tom 0%. It's the fickles of sowing!

      So annoying not to know the age of the seed with commercial companies, you can see perhaps why they do it but.... no less disappointing when seeds don't come up.

      Comment


      • clumsy
        clumsy commented
        Editing a comment
        That blog was great read very in depth research.

      • jayb
        jayb commented
        Editing a comment
        "Heritage Seed Library also say that very slightly underripe tomatoes are best for seed saving" I shall be more careful in the future, though I have found different varieties need sometimes a bit longer or shorter to ferment. I think better do separate lots if ripeness varies between tomatoes being processed.

      • jayb
        jayb commented
        Editing a comment
        You are right, I'm not sure I would be able to replace either Tina or Gemma, Jeannine worked some magic and I think obtained seeds for them from the university. Micro Tom is available to buy, but I originally had these seeds from Goodlife (from A4A) and so would want to keep them going. Her energy and enthusiasm came through so much in her posts, I still smile when I think of her.

    • #5
      Here is an interesting blog article about MicroTom. http://living-mudflower.blogspot.com...o-history.html
      Yes it is a good blog and lovely to find another micro tomato lover
      I think Damo started some breeding work a few years back.

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