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  • Mashua

    I've been leaving these in the ground and they seem to do well, some are lost I think to frost or maybe it gets too wet and mice enjoy a nibble. But on the whole they can be left to do their own thing and just dig some as and when. I had some in the polytunnel last year and they carried on growing pretty much all year. I did have a few odd looking fasciated stems though.

  • #2
    How do they taste?

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    • #3
      It's a bit of an odd one, hot and peppery with a slight aniseed sort of taste.

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      • #4
        A good plant for the perennial garden? Do you eat them cold or hot? Do they need frost-free conditions or can survive minimal frost? I am so ignorant about mashua

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        • #5
          They sound good!

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Galina View Post
            A good plant for the perennial garden? Do you eat them cold or hot? Do they need frost-free conditions or can survive minimal frost? I am so ignorant about mashua
            I think they are a lovely climbing plant to grow, strong growers and will try and swamp their space.They produce a good clump of tubers, but only very late in the year. I've had some over winter outside for about 5 years or so, so they can take some frost, but it perhaps doesn't get quite so cold here as with you? The flowers are just so pretty, Ken Aslet is best for flowering as it's not day length sensitive.

            I'm afraid I haven't experimented with cooking them much, the roots can be used much like a radish, I like them finely sliced like matchsticks sprinkled on a salad or in a sandwich. Cooked they loose their aggressive bite and become more mellow with that slight licorice taste. Quite good as a mixed roast root veg, they mash down well too but I wasn't that keen. I think they would be good in a pork dish or roasted around a joint.


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            • #7
              Originally posted by Silverleaf View Post
              They sound good!
              They sound good but, the taste is I think quite different and perhaps not to many peoples taste, though well worth trying and pretty enough to grow even if you don't eat them!

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              • #8
                1-IMG_5133 by jayb 35, on Flickr

                1-IMG_0903 by jayb 35, on Flickr

                1-IMG_5132 by jayb 35, on Flickr

                1-IMG_5135 by jayb 35, on Flickr

                IMG_1339 by jayb 35, on Flickr

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                • #9
                  They look a bit like nasturtiums.

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                  • #10
                    Just been reading up a bit on mashua, it sounds really interesting. I like the peppery taste of nasturtiums, so I guess I'd probably like this too?

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                    • #11
                      These weird plants fascinate me! I grew some oca a few years back but ended up losing it in the year I seriously neglected my veggies due to illness. Never even got to taste it.

                      I was thinking about getting some from Real Seeds but they have so many colours now I can't decide which I want, and I can't really afford £15 for the mixed bag. Oh well!

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Silverleaf View Post
                        Just been reading up a bit on mashua, it sounds really interesting. I like the peppery taste of nasturtiums, so I guess I'd probably like this too?
                        I would think it likely you would find them interesting, even like them!
                        I should have some for planting next spring, just give a nudge to remind me if you would like some to try.
                        Yes related to nasturtiums, same peppery taste just with aniseed.

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                        • #13
                          Thank you very much, that sounds lovely. They are really pretty too, and peppery aniseed definitely sounds good to me!

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                          • #14
                            I'll send Ken Aslet then you get the flowers to enjoy for much of mid summer and autumn. Cabbage whites can be a little bothersome but they don't seem to trash them as much as nasturtiums. I guess it gives other crops a break?

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                            • #15
                              Just remembered this! If you have any spare I'd love to try mashua.

                              I grew nasturtiums next to my brassicas last year, and while I had a few caterpillars on the broccoli and caulis the nasturtiums were completely untouched. Leaf miners on the chard, however, were a complete menace.

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