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Daubenton's Kale and relatives

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  • Galina
    commented on 's reply
    As to how true to the variegated Daubenton they will be is of course unknown. But hopefully they will produce a perennial kale with good cold tolerant characteristics. Frankly, there isn't a great deal of difference between kales, although the Taunton Dean tastes the sweetest to me.

  • clumsy
    commented on 's reply
    Garlic is hard to produce seeds it takes true dedication to do it, getting it to flower and the the small seeds to germinate is very difficult.

  • clumsy
    commented on 's reply
    That's great you have new fresh seeds now for the future.

  • Galina
    replied
    Have harvested the seeds of the flowering Daubenton kale now. The plant is still looking good despite having flowered. The earliest seed is looking the best. I have put just a few into a pot in the conservatory and today the first one germinated. Yay! The seeds are fertile!

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  • Galina
    commented on 's reply
    Oh definitely. But perennial kales were bred to be perennial by gardeners who, year after year, did not allow them to flower, but only took cuttings. Until the plants pretty much stopped flowering, because there was no point to it I guess. Just like the perennial leeks who only occasionally flower but multiply vegetatively as the main means of propagation.

    There are also efforts going on at the moment to make garlic produce fertile seeds again. With some success too. And of course potatoes, so many people experiment or actively breed the new super potatoes from tps (true potato seed from the seedballs). All good fun and helps the veg be more resilient to climate change and problems like blight and onion white rot in the future.

  • clumsy
    commented on 's reply
    Always a battle with nature. The 9 star broccoli is interesting after googling about it.

  • clumsy
    replied
    It's interesting but this plant must have produced seeds before somewhere in the past history.

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  • Galina
    replied
    Unfortunately the three-way cross with the 9 star perennial cauliflower as the third pollen partner did not work out, care of pigeons who ate their florets. I left them unprotected because the voles had devastated them under the cover, so now the pigeons got them. They fortunately left the others alone. Luckily I have taken cuttings of the 9 star perennial.

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  • Galina
    replied
    I'm not after seed renewal as Daubentons are traditionally propagated by cuttings, just like this plant which was a cutting that I took from the plant I got to start with from Goodlife, a member of A4A. It isn't about seed saving.

    What makes this one different is that Daubenton's don't usually flower and they are perennial. Our usual annual kales flower, then die. They are annuals. It remains to be seen whether this one will die after flowering. The kale I have been crossing it with, Portuguese kale, is perennial despite flowering, although I do take away all flower shoots (which we eat like Sprouting Broccoli).

    Both are only just about winter hardy, in fact I think the reason this one did flower was because it came close to perishing this winter. A cutting from the same mother plant growing in my MIL's garden (which is a lot more sheltered) did not flower.

    It will be interesting to select more winter hardy perennial kales and flowering kales from the plants that hopefully will grow from these seeds. Our perennial kales have barely survived from when they were popular in Victorian times, and there are only 3 British types that I am aware of. I was surprised that the Portuguese kale (seed was from Heritage Seed Library) was perennial too. Clearly other countries have perennial kales in addition to the three we know about.

    But the problem with the Portuguese kale also is hardiness. Out of all my plants from that Heritage Seed Library seed packet only one survived winter. And I have propagated from cuttings from that one plant ever since, like I do with the Daubenton kales.

    This project (should it work) gives more variety of perennial kales. And they could be better winter survivors. I am quite convinced that the offspring will not be identical to either of the parent plants, but both parents being perennial, I hope this feature will be part of the new varieties and that some of them will be standing up to severe cold weather too. Fingers crossed that it will all go right.
    Last edited by Galina; 29-05-2018, 11:20.

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  • clumsy
    commented on 's reply
    Definitely seed pods won't be long you'll have fresh seeds.

  • Galina
    replied
    I think we are getting seed pods and the oldest pods are looking slightly lumpy. Fingers crossed.
    Last edited by Galina; 28-05-2018, 20:56.

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  • clumsy
    commented on 's reply
    That looks beautiful.

  • Galina
    replied
    And flowering.

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  • Galina
    replied
    Well the buds still haven't opened on the variegated Daubenton's kale, but we are now at the advanced bud stage and there was a surprise. They are going to flower yellow after all. I wondered whether they would be compatible with the white flowering Portuguese kale. I researched white flowering kales last year and found nothing, but this morning I found an online article. Happy to report that the white flowering brassica oleracea is an asiatic form and it does indeed cross readily with the yellow flowering brassica oleracea. Hope the experiment works here too. I now have several white flowers open and the yellow flower buds will hopefully flower soon. They take a very long time to get from bud to open flower. The Portuguese kale is much quicker. I have some broccoli buds on the 9 star perennial (despite near wipe-out over winter), and they are nowhere near flowering. But I am leaving them all the same as it is also a brassica oleracea just in case I get an overlap in flowering.
    Last edited by Galina; 04-05-2018, 09:13.

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  • Galina
    replied
    Yes I am pleased with them now, but they did not look so good over winter. The oldest Daubenton and one of the Portuguese are clearly in their last year and part of the plants are just sticks now. And I am propagating from cuttings too, which is the normal way for Daubentons. Thank you for wishing me well for the experiment. Worst are the 9 Star Perennial Caulis, they really did not like this winter even though I had them protected with netting. I think protected under the netting, the voles did massive damage and also the cold weather. Still there is enough for cuttings to carry on there.

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