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Potatoes in tubs 2010

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  • Potatoes in tubs 2010

    I've started potting up some flower buckets with tubers, some will be for an earlier crop and others as back up to those grown on the plot in the hope one will miss Late Blight. I've still some to pot up. I'm hoping I still have some faves saved such as Black lippy, Palest Pink Eye and Big Flat Hat, but I don't know for sure yet, I'm still trying to sort through.

    Galina was so lovely and sent me Pink (Snookie) Dog and an amazing looking Blue (I'll have to check back to see what it was, I think I kept a note of what I sent) and gorgeous Snookie. I've potted up one of both Snookie and Pink Dog but as there is just one large tuber of the blue with just one sprout on it at the moment, I think I will pot the sprout on for a plant and keep the tuber to plant in the potato patch when it dries up enough.

    Happy days I'm soooooooooooooooooooo looking forward to growing potatoes this year, simple pleasures!

    Anyone else growing any potatoes in tubs this year?

  • #2
    2020?

    Not in tubs, no.

    I have a few fairly standard varieties which I might cautiously start planting today in a normal veg bed.
    But I also have two which Galina kindly (again!) donated to the seed circle just over a year ago which I think were created by you, jayb. One is Superspud and the other she called Rafli. I had a bumper crop from Rafli and was extremely impressed with it. Looking forward very much to growing it again.

    I can see that flower buckets would be very good for more managed growing of varieties you specially want to keep an eye on.
    Do you drill holes for drainage or are they not the kind of flower bucket I’m imagining?

    Comment


    • jayb
      jayb commented
      Editing a comment
      Flower buckets are just a tad too small to be great containers for potatoes but they are ok. They are good if you want to keep several varieties from mingling. Yes drainage holes are needed and the drill makes short work, you can drill them empty or filled (when I forget!) I find about an inch from the bottom works quite well here, allows excess water to drain but gives a little reservoir for hot days when plants are in full swing.

  • #3
    Rafli and Superspud origins: Bred by Jayb. She deliberately crossed the blight susceptible varieties Pink Fir Apple and Ratte with the very blight resistant Sarpo Kifli and the tubers in the packet are the ones that did best for me. Kifli x Ratte #1 (which I named “Rafli” as Jayb did not name them) has very many tubers, mostly egg sized or a little smaller, a really good flavoured salad spud. Second early with pretty good blight resistance, but not immune to blight.

    Kifli x Pink Fir Apple #6 is an absolute “Super Spud”. Large tubers (the ones in the circle are smaller seed potatoes), high yield, excellent flavour and waxy consistency. Here they were entirely unaffected when everything else showed signs of blight. The foliage is quite large and they are late. They need main crop spacing. I have seen flowers on them, but unfortunately none made berries for me so far.


    Last year Super Spud did show a little blight, maybe we had a different strain of it, but still very excellent.

    Comment


    • Jang
      Jang commented
      Editing a comment
      I've just referred back to this description as I couldn't tell my Rafli apart from my Superspud.
      Reading your description, Galina, I've come to the conclusion that somehow all the Jayb potatoes I'm growing are Rafli - which I love - as they're all similar salad potatoes. So the ones I've been carefully growing as Superspud are actually Rafli. The mix up must have occurred last year. Ah well, very nice to have lots of Rafli!

    • Galina
      Galina commented
      Editing a comment
      Of course I have grown both of them again this year. Super Spud was entirely blight resistant and I could have left them a bit longer, but wanted the bed for winter veg, Rafli pretty nearly so although a few tubers were soft as I should have probably harvested them earlier, but this year the yield was just wonderful. I am starting to see why they did so well for you Jan. They have always had a decent yield, but this year easily twice what I normally expect. The largest Rafli are the same size as an average Super Spud and the colour is very similar. Super Spud foliage is a bit larger.

    • Jang
      Jang commented
      Editing a comment
      Very pleased your Rafli have come up trumps this year. Your conditions now perhaps favour them more. Rafli have done brilliantly again here this year. This is a potato growing area so I guess the soil and weather conditions are on my side. Most varieties have done well in fact.

      I'm impressed with Ambo which is a blight resistant second early which I've grown for three years now, and the International Kidney which I left for main crop are huge and still quite tasty. Potato harvesting has been a delight ver the last week or so.

  • #4
    For some reason I feel 10 years younger. Didn't have plans to grow in tubs this year, but that may change depending on how strict the pandemic lockdown gets going forward. If I can't get to the allotment I'll have to grow them in tubs at home. Currently chitting are Inca Bella - Mayan Gold - Salad Blue - Highland Burgundy Red - Heiderot - Red Emmalie. Intermediate to high berry production.

    Comment


    • triffid
      triffid commented
      Editing a comment
      Just a cheeky reference to the title But I don't think you're kidding yourself! Stress really does its job of taxing the system

    • Jang
      Jang commented
      Editing a comment
      Oh dear! Slow of me.

    • jayb
      jayb commented
      Editing a comment
      lol and I retyped the date to correct it from 2002! Where's number check when you need it!

  • #5
    We have a couple of the same varieties. I'm growing Mayan Gold again too, they are good and yes lots of berries with them. I think I have a saved tuber or two of Red Emmalie, which again I've found good for berries. Plus I've used both these as crossing parents.
    Heidie Red is new to me this year, but one I'm looking forward to sampling.

    Comment


    • triffid
      triffid commented
      Editing a comment
      When saving your own potatoes for seed tubers, do you find growing them in compost in containers reduces disease load at all?

    • jayb
      jayb commented
      Editing a comment
      I think it can but not always, some years I find bought in Multi-purpose lends problems. My veggie plot is fairly clean land and I try and grow a fresh area that's not grow potatoes for a number of years, But I still find problems are brought in sometimes with seed potatoes (certified) even being grown on previously uncultivated ground. I find growing in pots/containers can be useful if you don't want to grow unknown tubers on your plot.

  • #6
    Most of the first planting in tubs have pushed through. First Early Abbot was the first. I've moved all of the tubs from the greenhouse to polytunnel and they'll go out I should think mid month unless the weather forecast is frosty.

    Comment


    • #7
      Harvested my Yetholm....small crop but inordinately pleased to have some

      Comment


      • Galina
        Galina commented
        Editing a comment
        Did you get all three colours Hector?

      • Jang
        Jang commented
        Editing a comment
        Exciting. First time growing?
        I’ve only read the back story and Rebsie’s descriptions. One for the list I think.
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