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  • Tps from Picasso

    I have written in various other places about these tps. They were from a volunteer Picasso last year that was practically buried underneath other plants and, surprisingly, produced berries for me.

    These berries matured and produced tps, which germinated nicely and without trouble.

    Have planted them out a week ago. Here are the young plants Lets hope there will be some nice potatoes to select from. As the plants went in, a few already had tiny roundish tubers forming.

  • #2
    They are looking great, lovely and green. I bet they are just going to romp ahead. These are going to be fun to see how they flower and harvest time

    Comment


    • Galina
      Galina commented
      Editing a comment
      A couple of casualties, but not many. They look better than when they went out - the fleece did the trick with the last frosty night. I also hope they will romp away. I have a second batch which I have planted into pots. May or may not plant those out. They do ok in pots and are more blight protected, but the tubers would get bigger outdoors.
      Last edited by Galina; 24-05-2016, 08:01.

  • #3
    Yes but if you have run out of space growing them on in pots, even smaller ones, will give you the chance to select the best on taste and appearance and save them for planting next year.

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    • Galina
      Galina commented
      Editing a comment
      Have planted the second batch as well. About 20 plants at half normal potato spacing. And over a foot for some of the plants, but those could get squeezed before long when the White Volunteer squashes adjacent take off, so they better make the most of their temporary bigger spacing. 3 plants of the second batch had tiny tubers, mostly round.

  • #4
    Just looked at the picture above, taken just over a month ago. Here is an update. Wish I had planted them a bit further apart. Can't show the ones that were planted as a second batch so easily, because they are among others stuff, like the courgettes, but some of the second lot are even larger in plant size. A few are still tiny, but most have gone to sizeable plants with all this rain.

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    • #5
      They look great!

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      • #6
        They are looking fab, lovely healthy plants, lack of space might limit tuber size somewhat but multiple plantings will give you a wider selection to consider for next year. Win win

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        • Galina
          Galina commented
          Editing a comment
          Should be better than in a smallish plant pot. You can tell that I have only had tps in a pot before where the plants stay much smaller. I am really surprised at the size they got to in the end. Definitely not much air flow though

      • #7
        Thank you and so far they look ok, but it can only be a matter of a few days unless they are resistant. Maybe some of the plants are.

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        • #8
          The Picasso from the first batch in the tightly packed patch shown above will have to have their foliage culled. I can't just pull off blighted leaf spots anymore, they are too far gone. The second planted batch is looking better, but every day I am pulling leaves. So cutting the foliage and just leaving the stems sticking out should make it easier to find the tubers for each plant. They were planted evenly spaced, but have become badly entangled. Any that are still looking really good I might mark with a ribbon round the stem. I will also have to cut the foliage on some other potatoes.

          And in a few days - digging for gold will begin!

          Fingers crossed for some good tubers from these. There is quite a bit of rain forecast that should help digging them out once our rock-hard soil softens up a bit.
          Last edited by Galina; 01-08-2016, 12:30.

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          • #9
            There are always surprises in the garden. Have just cut the stems of the first batch of Picasso tps plants. I have already spotted several yellow tubers peaking out - these plants were not earthed up - maybe they would have appreciated that? Did you earth your tps plants up Silverleaf?

            One plant grew a stem which was leaning over and rerooted itself a little further away. I guess not too surprising, because tomatoes do that. Just that I have not come across this in potatoes.

            The second surprise were these aerial tubers. Lots of them along the main stem and one small egg sized on a secondary stem. I wonder why aerial tubers at all? Whether they have developed at the expense of tubers in the ground? And thirdly, can I use them for anything? I have left the foliage on this plant because it is one of the better ones anyway.

            Comment


            • jayb
              jayb commented
              Editing a comment
              Blackeg has been more prevalent here than usual this year, mostly with bought in potatoes. All the spuds went into clean ground too.
              Can't make out the lower stems on yours, but here it's one of the first things I suspect if I see aerial tubers. Though your conditions are different to mine.

            • Galina
              Galina commented
              Editing a comment
              I had blackleg once and the base of the plant was gone as I remember. Hardly any tubers. This plant looked fine and the root yield was good as well. I wondered whether it might be a response to the packed conditions. This was a large plant and badly squeezed with my 15cm separation allowance to its neighbour and to the next row. On the other hand June was very wet indeed and a soil borne nasty could be the culprit.

            • Galina
              Galina commented
              Editing a comment
              Just read that Rebsie (when talking about the Foula Red potato) thought aerial tubers were in response to slug damage. Well there is plenty of that about this year too. Hey-ho ............ I'll just stop worrying about it. Probably not a horrible disease which will strike down potato plants for decades to come ...............................

          • #10
            I could not wait any longer and have dug them up. First of all absolute delight that I found just so many potatoes. They were grown in just under 2 square yards. The product of one pot of seedlings that I photographed in spring. I have the other batch still to do. There are no flowers or berries on any of them.

            The plant with the aerial tubers had a decent amount of tubers as well and no black scurf.

            The plants that went in as small plants have had lower production, as low as only one tuber. Bigger plants had some good sized tubers. I think in future I will only use bigger seedlings. Plants that were small as seedling have stayed small in both batches and had low yields.

            Most were yellow with a bit of red and quite similar to Picasso. But we had plain yellow and plain salmon red too.

            The shapes were mostly roundish to egg shaped, but some were elongated and one had tiny round pebbles.

            I marked plants that still had reasonably good foliage with a tag. Several of the blight resistant trays also have good yield, which is pleasing.

            I found several stems that must have withered a while ago. I assume these are earlier maturing types? But as they were also on small plants maybe not. Needs checking.

            Some were badly slug eaten and hollowed out, others not touched. Quite a variety. Now I will number them, weigh them and taste testing can begin.
            Last edited by Galina; 04-08-2016, 16:43.

            Comment


            • jayb
              jayb commented
              Editing a comment
              Great pictures, they look fab, lovely lot of diversity.

          • #11
            OH tasted the first 6. Tried to do it your way in the microwave, Silverleaf, and had them arranged on a plate in order with numbers painted on the plate, but had a job keeping them from jumping about. In the end the microwave had to be on low to stop them exploding and jumping and hissing. 6 tested, none with outstanding flavour, nice enough was the verdict for most of them, although one had a bitter aftertaste. Consistency was varied: we had floury, semi floury and salad potato. Need to think of a better way way of cooking them. . Perhaps separated with stems of chard on one steamer tray. The first in the sequence marked with a toothpick seems to work, then clockwise.

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            • #12
              Yayy, what an excellent haul from your first saved tps, good growing. What about baby baked on a baking sheet? There is always the possibility of getting bitter tubers, on the odd occasion I've had some I just chuck them out.

              It's often worth giving tubers saved from tps a full season grown from seed potato, as some that appear to have given a small harvest do much better, but if they don't taste good enough or have other qualities you are looking for I guess not much point.

              How many are you thinking you will select?

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              • #13
                Have now dug up the second lot too. Although they had more room to spread, the overall yield was a little lower per plant. One plant from the second lot, which is one of the best blight resistant plants (but still has blight spots on many leaves) is developing flower buds. The tiniest hint of flowers. I fear that the plant will be gone before the flowers open let alone mature berries, but I left it growing - good to know that there is any sort of tendency for flowering. To see it in a first year plant from tps, was a good surprise. I am in two minds whether I should cut the top of the plant and root in order to give them a better chance (see Kenosha Project on FB in the last few days) where this is recommended as a good way for producing berries for shy varieties.

                How many to select? I really don't know. I have discarded into the cooking box any with really low yield and small tubers. The others have not all been tested yet. After testing I will keep every remaining tuber of tasty and blight resistant plants, then perhaps 2 tubers of tasty plants? In the second taste test we had 3 out of 6 that were good, but only 1 out of the first lot.

                I put the second 6 matched tubers into the steamer - separated by 3 chard stems across the steamer basket. The first one had a toothpick in it, then clockwise. This worked very well. Surprisingly we had consistencies from salad to very floury.

                I had never heard of bitter potatoes, thanks for reassurance that you had some of those as well.

                When the oven is on for something else it is a great idea to make mini-bakers for taste-testing. Thank you for the suggestion.
                Last edited by Galina; 10-08-2016, 16:55.

                Comment


                • jayb
                  jayb commented
                  Editing a comment
                  I should add bitter potatoes should not be eaten, the same as ones that have greened, they have raised levels of Solanine which is toxic in higher levels. All regular seed potatoes are tested for levels before making it through selection process. Luckily for us the bitterness is easy to detect by taste so we can cull out any bitter tps plants.

                • jayb
                  jayb commented
                  Editing a comment
                  William Whitson puts it better, "No potato that you grow from seed is likely to do you serious or permanent harm when consumed in small amounts. Solanine is quite bitter, so as it rises in concentration, the odds that you will finish chewing a mouthful decline dramatically. Potatoes that taste just a little bitter may cause no reaction at all in some people, but unpleasant results in others. The typical response to a small overdose of solanine is diarrhea. A moderate overdose takes it up to nausea and vomiting. A serious overdose can result in confusion, weakness, and unconsciousness (Ruprich 2009). Symptoms may appear about four hours after consumption (Mensinga 2005)." There is more to read on his site https://www.cultivariable.com/instru...ed-tps/#safety

                • Galina
                  Galina commented
                  Editing a comment
                  I appreciate this Jayb. OH described it as a bitter 'aftertaste' rather than 'spitting out bitter'. But the principle applies and these tubers will not be allowed to propagate. Thank you for the warning about possible increased solanine. Conversely he described one potato in the first batch as 'sweet'. Presumably the solanine can vary quite a lot in both directions.

              • #14
                Originally posted by Galina View Post
                One plant from the second lot, which is one of the best blight resistant plants (but still has blight spots on many leaves) is developing flower buds. The tiniest hint of flowers. I fear that the plant will be gone before the flowers open let alone mature berries, but I left it growing - good to know that there is any sort of tendency for flowering. To see it in a first year plant from tps, was a good surprise. I am in two minds whether I should cut the top of the plant and root in order to give them a better chance (see Kenosha Project on FB in the last few days) where this is recommended as a good way for producing berries for shy varieties.
                I find many first year tps flower in the first year though not all are able to set berries, if you get flowers setting you can always pick the stem and put it water. You'll be able to grow the berries on inside. Sounds similar to rooting the top (not read the thread yet, sorry if I've got it all wrong)


                then perhaps 2 tubers of tasty plants?
                Even if you keep just one or two you could always take pull starts in the spring to increase plant numbers.


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                • #15
                  No Jayb, you got it absolutely right and (posts crossing) I have just compared both methods elsewhere on here and mused why they are successful.

                  Lol, I think just 2 will be ample for next year given available space Presumably this will be followed by another round of culls. But the method of growing from sprouts works well for bulking up any eventual winners.

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