Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Plot

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Plot

    I went to the this is how it looks. The plot holders who have been looking after harvested loads of courgettes about 200 plants. They took them to 3 gurdwaras and a local charity also got a load. I was told since July the courgettes meals have fed around 6000 people approx could be more. Plus the mice got fed on chickpeas that no one harvested but cleared them today.

  • #2
    This is outstanding, and all from your plot, just goes to show what is possible. They must have been busy picking and carrying fruits from 200 plants!
    A shame about the chickpeas, but at least they gave a good covering to the plot, keeping it in good health and stopped weeds from invading.

    What plans have you for the plot?

    Comment


    • clumsy
      clumsy commented
      Editing a comment
      They've been picking them when they are really big probably 3 or 4 kg even more some bigger than pumpkins. The empty hop bags they only managed to put 8 in a time lifting the bag was very heavy. Saw how they used them in the gurdwara they cut them without taking the big seeds they used it all.Kept the weeds down was easy to look after without much labour apart from picking,packig delivery no one minded.

      Still not sure how to manage it. Plot holders insist I don't leave. Might do more pumpkins to balance it out if I do. Have to take things day by day. Was thinking of putting garlic but decided not too. Was thinking of japenese garlic but the price it's not worth.

    • jayb
      jayb commented
      Editing a comment
      Such a good use of vegetables and no waste, makes me take a step back and think how fussy I've become. You have good people around you and they are following you in what goes around comes around.

      What is Japanese garlic, I've not seen that before?

  • #3
    A lot of good has come from your charity plot. So glad it could carry on. Pity about the chick peas.

    Comment


    • #4
      This is wonderful, so many people fed from your space. You have great neighbours! What kind of area was planted to courgettes and pumpkins?

      Corn and beans would be a low maintenance addition to make the most of that vertical space unoccupied by the squash. Thanks to Jang I grew Medzi this year and I'm blown away by the productivity - 5 cobs on some stalks and multiple stalks per plant.

      Overwinter cover could be provided by cima di rapa, a little seed goes a long way and one sowing yields muliple harvests as they sprout new heads.

      Comment


      • triffid
        triffid commented
        Editing a comment
        When did you sow it? I'm under the impression it's an autumn/winter crop. Spring sowings would bolt before the plant is a decent size.

      • jayb
        jayb commented
        Editing a comment
        I've not grown them for a few years but remember even grown later in the season they go to seed quickly and they needed prompt and regular picking. Perhaps I didn't grow them very well.

      • Jang
        Jang commented
        Editing a comment
        I sowed some 90 day in late July, thinking it might mature in October. I’ll try some later, but I’m not very good at managing crops which need picking within a short window.
        I’ll give it another go in the polytunnel overwinter.
        There are a few other fast maturing greens which I don’t often get on very well with like komatsuna, broccoli raab, kailaan kich etc. I keep trying!

    • #5
      I was also thinking beans and corn might work too
      Although I was thinking more of bush drying beans. If an area was covered with cardboard and or black plastic (or whatever you have) to keep it weed-free until needed, a direct sowing could be made. As long as slugs aren't too many there's not much else to do until harvest time when the whole plant can be cut and harvested in one go. As a bonus mice generally aren't too fussed on eating the crop.

      Comment


      • clumsy
        clumsy commented
        Editing a comment
        I think pigeons are another problem for direct sowing of sweetcorn and beans, like slugs. Nice ideas food thought.

      • jayb
        jayb commented
        Editing a comment
        Forgot about them, we have a few resident wood pigeons around, but generally, they are not too much of a problem. Blackbirds and crows on the other hand are a pain for pulling up seedling beans and peas. Have to cover these. Although earlier in the year purple sprouting was hit badly by pigeons and I had to cover the plants. There is always something on the take.

      • Jang
        Jang commented
        Editing a comment
        Yes, I had a whole planting of sweetcorn pulled up by birds this year. I’d never thought to cover them before. Used bottles for the second attempt but rather labour intensive. Once established look after themselves well.

        Direct sowing under fleece/ mesh if available?

    • #6
      cima di rapa I think you sow it autumn like now then when you have few leaves while the plant is still small harvest it and keep harvesting like that. Similar to callaloo if left to get big it’s natural instinct is to go to seed. Plus it needs the soil to be kept moist like all leafy greens.

      The soil that courgettes/marrows and pumpkins on plot is mostly clay over the years with manure and hops it became soft.

      Comment


      • Jang
        Jang commented
        Editing a comment
        Thanks clumsy. I suppose I tend to neglect them for other green leaves which look more inviting. Overwinter seems to be the best plan.

    • #7
      They were harvesting maybe the last of the courgettes/marrows going to the gurdwara.

      Comment


      • Jang
        Jang commented
        Editing a comment
        That's a great harvest. And yes, slowing down here too. Guess a lot depends on the weather for the next two or three weeks.

      • jayb
        jayb commented
        Editing a comment
        That is some haul, I love how diverse they look too.
        Will you save any for seed to grow again?

      • clumsy
        clumsy commented
        Editing a comment
        Yes because I don't have any seeds left. I didn't get a chance to do the normal with tying the flower. But I don't think their might be too much of an issue even if they have cross pollinated..
    Working...
    X